James Fahn

James Fahn
James Fahn 
Global Director of Environmental Programs
Internews

James Fahn is the Global Director of Internews’ Environmental Programs and a Lecturer at UC-Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. He also serves as the executive director of Internews’ Earth Journalism Network, which connects over 4,500 journalists covering environmental issues around the world.

Fahn is a journalist who has primarily focused on environmental and science issues in developing countries. For nine years during the 1990s, Fahn was based in Thailand where he was a reporter and editor for The Nation, an English-language daily newspaper based in Bangkok, and hosted a television show. His book, "A Land on Fire" recounts the issues and scandals he uncovered while working on the environmental beat in Southeast Asia.

He has also written for the New York Times, The Economist, Newsweek, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Jakarta Post, SciDev.net, Nature.com, the Huffington Post and the Columbia Journalism Review.

Fahn was the co-founder of the Thai Society of Environmental Journalists, the country director for Internews’ Burma program, and has also worked for the Ford Foundation as a program associate in the field of environment and development.

He has a master’s degree in international affairs from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree from Amherst College. Fahn received UNEP’s Global 500 Award for The Nation’s environmental reporting, and was pinned by Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn for his service to Thailand.

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  • The Amazon Is Burning

    Business Insider
    Saturday, January 24, 2015

    (InfoAmazonia, a project of Internews' Earth Journalism Network, is featured in this article from Business Insider.)

    "Save the rain forest" is a mantra we've all grown up with, and for good reason.

    About 17% of the Amazon rain forest has been lost in the last 50 years, according to the World Wildlife Fund. While the annual rate of deforestation has slowed in recent years, cattle ranching and other forms of agriculture remain serious threats to the rain forest.

  • Accountability after Haiyan

    IRIN
    Wednesday, January 21, 2015

    (Stijn Aelbers, who was project director for Internews' humanitarian radio project in the Philippines, was interviewed for this article from IRIN News.)

    LONDON, 21 January 2015 (IRIN) - When Typhoon Haiyan swept across the central Philippines in November 2013, the subsequent emergency response was a test case for the aid industry's aspiration to be accountable to affected populations.

    The phrase became a term of art, with its own initials, AAP, and in the early days of the response the UN appointed its first ever AAP Coordinator.

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