Humanitarian Communications

Image for Humanitarian Communications
(credit: Meridith Kohut/Internews)

In humanitarian disasters people affected by the unfolding tragedy need more than physical necessities: they also have an urgent need for information. From earthquakes to armed conflicts, survival can depend on knowing the answers to questions such as: is it safe to go back home? Should I stay with my family or go elsewhere for help? What is the extent of the damage? Where can I get clean water and food? What are the symptoms of cholera? Where is the nearest health facility?

Since the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia, Internews has been building partnerships and working closely with humanitarian organizations and government agencies at all stages during emergency responses.

Internews is a pre-qualified partner of the UK Government’s Rapid Response Facility (RRF), and operates at the heart of the humanitarian system in partnership with key agencies such as the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Internews also hosts the CDAC (Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities) Secretariat in London.

More information:

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