Global Digital Download

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The Global Digital Download is a weekly publication that aggregates resources on Internet freedom, highlighting trends in digital and social media that intersect with freedom of expression, policy, privacy, censorship and new technologies. The GDD includes information about relevant events, news, and research. To find past articles and research, search the archive database.

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  • (The Wall Street Journal, Thursday, October 2, 2014)
    Facebook Thursday said it has changed how it conducts experiments on users, by giving its researchers more guidance and adding internal reviews. But the company declined to discuss other details of the changes, which some outsiders called inadequate. The changes follow the disclosure in June of an earlier experiment where Facebook researchers altered the news feeds of 700,000 users, omitting either positive or negative emotions to study how emotions spread on the social network.
  • (Ars Technica, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    Over the past few days, activists and protesters in Hong Kong have been targeted by mobile device malware that gives an attacker the ability to monitor their communications. What’s unusual about the malware, which has been spread through mobile message “phishing “ attacks, is that the attacks have targeted and successfully infected both Android and iOS devices.

  • (Global Voices, Thursday, October 2, 2014)
    On September 28, after Hong Kong police unleashed tear gas on protesters, many said that they could not access the Internet with their mobile phones and had to run to Central or Wanchai districts before they could send their messages. Since then, a large number of protesters have downloaded FireChat to prepare for communication during network outages or network congestion.
  • (The Wall Street Journal, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    When Google Inc. launched its fast Internet service in Kansas City in 2012, the Web giant said it wanted to spread broadband widely and close the “digital divide.” But a survey conducted for The Wall Street Journal suggests the company is far from achieving that goal.

  • (The Wall Street Journal, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    Google Inc. will stop posting snippets from several large German newspapers beginning next week, rather than pay for the right to post them, escalating a fight with the country’s publishers amid broader pressure on the company in Europe.

  • (Global Voices, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    After the recent extensive protesting in Hong Kong, many are now wondering if it is possible for a network blackout to be imposed. This happens on a regular basis in regions of mainland China like Xinjiang, where authorities use Internet blackouts to contain ethnic unrest among the region's Uyghur minority. Yet network infrastructure and corporate governance is much less tightly controlled in the special administrative region of Hong Kong.

  • (Global Voices, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    A court in Russia has convicted a 23-year-old woman of illegally disseminating pornography on the Internet, handing down a two-year suspended sentence.

  • (Global Voices, Thursday, October 2, 2014)

    This year, there are several mobile apps available to make Durga Puja's pandal hopping better planned and more informed than ever. Indians’ growing tech savviness has brought mobile computing to new spheres of life. Apps that help navigate religious and cultural festivities are now at the fingertips of millions of Indians.

  • (Global Voices, Thursday, October 2, 2014)
    On September 28, after Hong Kong police unleashed tear gas on protesters, many said that they could not access the Internet with their mobile phones and had to run to Central or Wanchai districts before they could send their messages. Since then, a large number of protesters have downloaded FireChat to prepare for communication during network outages or network congestion.
  • (Financial Times, Wednesday, October 1, 2014)
    A clash between Google and European media groups stepped up a gear on Wednesday after the US tech company announced that it would stop publishing snippets of their articles in search results. The move follows a dispute over intellectual property rights between Google and publishers including Axel Springer, Europe’s biggest newspaper publisher by circulation.
     
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