• Climate Journalism Thrives in Latin America

    ?Eres periodista o comunicador en America Latina? Participa de la encuesta regioanl sobre periodismo y cambio climatico.
    Monday, October 3, 2016

    “Latin America is perhaps the best example of economic growth together with carbon emissions reduction,” says Christiana Figueres, former executive-secretary of the UN´s Climate Change Convention, summarizing the region’s leadership in attempting to halt global warming. Figueres made her point to hundreds of journalists during an EJN webinar organized in partnership with Latin Clima earlier this year.

  • Journalists from Developing Countries to Cover the “COP of Action” in Morocco

    Marrakech COP22 CMP12 - UN Climate Change Conference 2016
    Monday, October 3, 2016

    Last December during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)  Conference of Parties (COP), 195 countries came together to adopt The Paris Agreement, the first universal climate agreement meant to tackle climate change. Targets set by the Agreement include limiting the rise in global temperature to an average of no more than 2 degrees Celsius, and reducing CO2 emissions by 50% by 2050, and 100% by 2100.

  • Fellowship Brings Indigenous Journalists to World’s Largest Biodiversity Conference

    Monday, October 3, 2016

    Journalists from 16 countries participated in an Earth Journalism Network (EJN) Fellowship program this month that took them to the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Honolulu, Hawai’i, where indigenous communities and their role in global conservation efforts took center stage. The EJN delegation, which included indigenous reporters from seven biodiversity-rich nations, joined leaders from governments, civil society and the private sector for high-level discussions to set the world’s conservation agenda after ambitious targets were established in Paris last year.

  • Journalism Projects around the World Address the Human Dimensions of Climate Change

    Tuesday, September 27, 2016

    Vulnerable and under-represented populations—in particular women, youth, and indigenous communities—often face a serious information gap when it comes to solutions-based information on how to adapt to climate change’s impacts. Despite bearing the least responsibility for the conditions accelerating climate change, they are often impacted most and their voices and concerns are rarely heard, in either local or international media.

  • HIV: Igniting Conversations that Bring About Change

    Monday, September 26, 2016

    South Africa is the country with the largest number of HIV positive people in the world and the country with the largest antiretroviral program. “Test and treat” can turn the epidemic around, but only if HIV testing becomes the norm. Unfortunately, some of the fundamentals of HIV and the gains of treatment have still not been absorbed by the general population. 

    Journalists have a vital role to play - to report the science and dispel rumor and myth. 

    Read more

  • J-School Graduates Win Prestigious Award for New Media Thesis Project

    Berkeley Journalism - UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
    Friday, September 23, 2016

    (Congratulations to Earth Journalism student Nina Zou and her classmate at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, Rachel Hiles, on winning the Online News Association’s David Teeuwen Student Journalism Award for their multimedia presentation “Chasing Lithium." The ground-breaking story follows the life-cycle of lithium from mining in Bolivia, to battery manufacturing, and disposal in China. The story was developed in part through Zou’s

  • HIV: Igniting Conversations that Bring About Change

    Friday, September 23, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    As of September 1, South Africa is implementing “test and treat” — where every HIV positive person is placed on an anti-retroviral treatment (ART) program, regardless of their CD4 count, an indicator of how well the immune system is working. The policy follows the announcement of new guidelines for HIV management by the World Health Organization (WHO) in December 2015.

  • Tracking Rumors to Contain Disease: The Case of DeySay in Liberia’s Ebola Outbreak

    USAID: From the American people
    Thursday, September 22, 2016

    (Internews' project in Liberia to address rumors about Ebola is described in this article from USAID.)

    Rumors spread misinformation, fuel mistrust, cause panic and sometimes even prompt irrational behaviors. This is particularly true in the context of a health emergency when accurate information about a disease—how to prevent, detect, contain and treat it—can mean the difference between staying healthy or becoming infected and, in the worst case scenario, dying from it.