Interactive Mapping Project in the Amazon Region Begins

Internews’ Earth Journalism Network and partner O Eco will build a new digital InfoAmazonia GeoJournalism platform over the next year.

Journalist photographs a tree in the Amazon
A journalist snaps a shot of the local flora during a 2011 mapping workshop in the Amazon.  (credit: James Fahn/Internews)

This project will create an interactive map of the Amazon basin that contains layers of information combining satellite images, news, information and multi-media reports about climate and development from both professional and citizen journalists.

Journalists based in the Amazon region, including those in the new Pan-Amazon Communicators network, will produce stories on climate, forestry and development issues and will upload GPS-tagged stories to the platform.

The information they produce will help policy groups and the public accurately report and respond to the region’s need to combat forest fires and deforestation, adapt to environmental change and build a sustainable economy. 

Funding to develop the platform comes from the Climate Development & Knowledge Network (CDKN) and builds on previous projects which supported and trained networks of Amazon journalists.

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