Thai Citizen Journalists Learn How to Report on Conflict and Justice

Thai citizen journalist, Abdulloh Doloh produced a video looking at local efforts to find access to justice after a crackdown on protestors at the Tak Bai Police Station, Narathiwat in 2004.

Thailand - Takbai - Remember Cikloh Patani

(September 8, 2010) In Southern Thailand, Internews is operating a Media Training Center (MTC) for journalists and members of civil society to help them better report on the simmering insurgency in Thailand's three southern most provinces of Pattani, Narathiwat and Yala.

Although the conflict has claimed over 4,000 lives since it re-ignited in 2004, it remains relatively under-reported in the Thai media.

Internews has been working with a combination of civic groups and professional media organizations to inform national policy debates on the conflict. Internews' trainings and mentoring of local journalists and citizen journalists are helping to increase the quantity and quality of reporting on the conflict by emphasizing local voices which are often overlooked by the Bangkok-based media.

Internews recently conducted a two week TV journalism boot camp at the MTC for citizen journalists in the South in which some of the first-time journalists chose to look at local efforts to find access to justice.

This video report was produced during the training by a citizen journalist, Abdulloh Doloh, with no prior journalism experience. The program was aired on Thailand's national public broadcaster, Thai PBS.

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