A Multimedia Center in Afghanistan Helps People with Disabilities Access Technology

Part of InternewsNext, a series highlighting 30 youth-led media initiatives.

“Before coming to this center, I had little information about the Internet. Now I know how to use it to improve my life and profession. Now it is easy for me to solve my own professional problems and I can connect to the world very easily,” says Mohitullah Mujahid.

Mohitullah, an economics student from Nangarhar University who was born without hands and some of his toes, comes regularly to the Anaar Multimedia Center in Jalalabad to use the computers for his studies.

“I want to tell young people in this country to work hard and to focus on their education,” says Mujahid. “Young people should work hard, because the future of this country depends on youth.”

View a video interview with Mohitullah.

With funding from USAID as part of the Afghanistan Media Development & Empowerment Project (AMDEP), Internews has established multimedia centers in Herat, Ma-zar-e-Sharif, Jalalabad and Kandahar. The centers offer access to the Internet and provide training in new media skills.

Since their launching in August 2011, the multimedia centers have opened their doors to over 10,000 visitors, and have also ensured accessibility for the disabled.

“If they get an education, disabled people can do everything that others can do,” says Mohitullah. “Many more Anaar Centers should be established in other places so our brothers and sisters can educate themselves. We can progress with the help of new technology.

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