• In South Sudan, Solar Power Brings a Community Radio Station Back on Air

    A man installs a solar panel
    Tuesday, December 8, 2015

    Voice of Freedom FM, a community radio station in Magwi, Central Equatoria State, South Sudan, covers everything from local and international news to original programming on conflict resolution, the rights of children, women and persons with disabilities. Or at least it did, until basic maintenance issues forced the station to close in early 2015.

    Situated on a 100 x 100 meter plot of land and with a 60-meter mast donated by the county commissioner, Voice of Freedom, which broadcasts in five different languages, has largely been dependent on resources donated by the community – such as volunteer time and story leads.

  • Open Earth: The Beginning of Global GeoJournalism

    Tuesday, December 8, 2015

    Environmental journalists face a unique challenge: covering local stories of environmental change requires an understanding of global processes.

    To address this challenge, Internews’ Earth Journalism Network (EJN) is launching OpenEarth.net to provide the first global GeoJournalism interface focused on surfacing patterns uncovered by local journalists around the world.

  • A More Vulnerable World

    Friday, December 4, 2015

    During the Paris Climate Talks (COP21), Internews' Earth Journalism Network (EJN) is posting a series of stories about climate’s impact on people called A More Vulnerable World

    From declining caribou herds in the Arctic north to water shortages in Nepal, Colombia, China and the Middle East to floods in South Asia, climate change is having a dramatic effect on the world's most vulnerable populations.

    The stories and videos from A More Vulnerable World focus on the efforts of local communities to control and retain their way of life.

  • Southern Africa in a “Climate Horror”

    Thursday, December 3, 2015

    Veteran environmental journalist Fiona Macleod is attending the Paris Climate Talks with Internews’ Earth Journalism Network (EJN) as a senior journalism mentor.

    Macleod says people in rural parts of Southern Africa are living in a “climate horror,” with women being hit hardest. With drought affecting large swathes of the region, she says data plays a hugely important role in helping journalists tell the stories of those who are most vulnerable. 

    Read a profile of Fiona Macleod

  • Southern Africa in a “Climate Horror”

    Wednesday, December 2, 2015

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    As the crucial COP21 climate talks get underway in Paris, veteran environmental journalist Fiona Macleod says people in rural parts of Southern Africa are living in a “climate horror,” with women being hit hardest. With drought affecting large swathes of the region, she says data plays a hugely important role in helping journalists tell the stories of those who are most vulnerable.

  • Climate Change through the Eyes of Women

    Monday, November 30, 2015
    Stella Paul, an environmental journalist from India, is part of a contingent of 40 journalists, journalism fellows and senior journalism mentors from around the world attending the Paris Climate Talks with Internews’ Earth Journalism Network (EJN).
     
  • Future Oceans: Change under Waves

    Monday, November 23, 2015

    Go to the stories on Future Oceans

    The oceans are currently in the midst of a massive ecological and economic shift. Technologies ranging from remote sensing to deep water drilling to ocean-going robots to enormous freezer ships are enabling humans to explore and exploit the oceans at an unprecedented scale in novel ways. We may thus be on the threshold of profound changes in our ability to manage and regulate the seas.

  • Reporting on the Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Most Vulnerable Communities

    A woman stands on the edge of a deep pit, collecting dirty water in a bucket tied to a rope
    Sunday, November 22, 2015

    Migration from the Marshall Islands to Oklahoma. Surging seas in Mozambique. Drought on Colombia’s remote La Guajira peninsula. These are some of the impacts we’re starting to see that are at least partially due to climate change. As the Earth’s average temperature increases, contributing to rising sea levels, warming oceans, and glacial retreat, it is the world’s poorest and most marginalized people that are the most vulnerable.