• Radio Bakdaw Reunites Family in Guiuan, Philippines

    Jessa Cabonegro
    Wednesday, January 15, 2014

    This story was written by Jessa Cabonegro, a radio presenter at Radyo Bakdaw, a station established in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan to help get information to affected people.

    Two months after the typhoon Yolanda, Diane Tiburcio still hadn't heard from her sister, brother-in-law and their family. Diane is like others from outside the affected areas who are still desperately hunting for their loved ones. Lack of communication is still a widespread problem. Luckily a temporary radio station launched in Guiuan, Eastern Samar brings hope to people like Diane.

  • Communication is aid, too

    Philippine EnviroNews
    Thursday, January 9, 2014

    A team from the Philippine Network of Environmental Journalists (PNEJ), a partner and member of the Internews Earth Journalism Network, visited Internews’ emergency radio station, 92.9 FM Radyo Bakdaw, in the small fishing town of Guiuan in Eastern Samar last December. Here is their report.

  • Radio Continues as a Stable Information Source Amid Uncertainty in South Sudan

    Donald Booth being interviewed by journalists
    Tuesday, January 7, 2014

    Local journalists in South Sudan, amid hope for negotiated peace and fear of ongoing conflict, have rallied to provide daily coverage that addresses both the major national issues and the impact of the conflict on their local communities.

    “In such an unstable and rapidly changing situation, I cannot overstate the value that these radio stations have for their communities. Calm, fact-based information is critical,” said Deborah Ensor, Internews Chief of Party in South Sudan. “The work of our South Sudanese colleagues in providing this service is extraordinary.”

  • Syrian refugees cut off from news, but it’s changing

    Humanosphere - news and analysis of global health and the fight against poverty
    Monday, January 6, 2014

    (Internews' humanitarian information project for Syrian refugees is covered in this article from Humanosphere.)

    Syrian refugees are not getting accurate and timely information that will help them survive. The onset of winter required relief organizations to distribute supplies that will help keep people warm during the cold months. Without a way to communicate plans, the organizations have a hard time doing their work.

  • Competitive Karaoke in a Disaster Zone

    v[]cativ
    Thursday, January 2, 2014

    (Internews' humanitarian radio project in the Philippines is covered in this blog post from vocativ.)

    Karaoke. It’s for drunk Japanese businessmen, drunk students and, well, drunk people, most of them loathsome human beings. It’s certainly not for the audience, because they have ears, and it’s rarely any better when it’s recorded or played back. So is it good for anything? How about disaster relief?