• Open Earth: The Beginning of Global GeoJournalism

    Tuesday, December 8, 2015

    Environmental journalists face a unique challenge: covering local stories of environmental change requires an understanding of global processes.

    To address this challenge, Internews’ Earth Journalism Network (EJN) is launching OpenEarth.net to provide the first global GeoJournalism interface focused on surfacing patterns uncovered by local journalists around the world.

  • Southern Africa in a “Climate Horror”

    Wednesday, December 2, 2015

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    As the crucial COP21 climate talks get underway in Paris, veteran environmental journalist Fiona Macleod says people in rural parts of Southern Africa are living in a “climate horror,” with women being hit hardest. With drought affecting large swathes of the region, she says data plays a hugely important role in helping journalists tell the stories of those who are most vulnerable.

  • Open Data in Asia’s Water Tower: data.thethirdpole.net

    Thursday, November 13, 2014

    "There was drought so we had to share the little water brought a long distance from irrigation canals to the field. This delay in rice planting is resulting in a late harvest," explains Ratna Darai, 47, a farmer in Daraipadhera, Nepal during an interview with thethirdpole.net reporter Ramesh Bhushal.

  • International Council of Partners Launched for Earth Journalism Network

    Wednesday, June 25, 2014

    As part of its 10th anniversary year, Internews’ Earth Journalism Network (EJN) has created a new Council of Partners to help guide future development of the network, particularly its regional activities. The Council was announced last month at Berkeley, where EJN gathered more than a dozen leaders of environmental journalists around the world at a training-of-trainers conference.

  • New Guide Helps Journalists Report on Oceans and Fisheries

    Cover: Covering the Seas
    Thursday, April 17, 2014

    The ocean is one of the most dynamic and yet most under-reported food systems on the planet. Close to one billion people rely on fish as their primary source of protein and, collectively, the nations of the world catch around 90 million metric tons of wild fish and shellfish from the oceans annually. But for journalists working on stories about often distant oceans and fisheries, engaging the general readership can be difficult.

  • Profile: Liu Lican, Environmental Writer

    Liu Lican
    Tuesday, April 15, 2014

    Liu Lican is the Co-founder and Programs Director in the Greenovation Hub, a Chinese grassroots NGO focusing on environmental protection and innovation. He also serves as project coordinator of Internews’ Earth Journalism Network and helped develop two reporting toolkits, “Environmental Health and Climate Change” and “Global Trade Reporting: New Trends in Africa-China-Western Countries Economic Integration – Fair Timber Trade as an Example.” His most recent book, “The Sick Villages in a Strong State,” is the first book in Chinese that reveals the so-called “cancer village” problem in China.

  • New Forum in Bhutan Supports Journalists Covering the Environment

    A group of journalists look out over a river
    Tuesday, December 17, 2013

    A group of journalists in Bhutan, the Himalayan Kingdom perhaps best known for its pursuit of Gross National Happiness, have joined together to create a local network of reporters committed to covering environmental issues.

    Working with the financial and technical support of Internews’ Earth Journalism Network and The Third Pole, the Bhutan Forum of Environmental Journalists was launched in October during a three-day workshop organized under the patronage of the Bhutan Media Foundation.

  • Making Data Personal

    dustduino sensor device
    Tuesday, December 17, 2013

    For many journalists, especially those working in developing countries, coverage of sensitive environmental issues is severely constrained by a lack of accessible information and data. And in certain ecosystems, such as the Amazon rainforest or Ganges Delta that are in constant flux, reliable data can be difficult to find.