Covering the Green Beat in Asia

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Environmental Change and Security Program Asia Program are hosting a panel discussion, "Covering the Green Beat in Asia" on April 27th at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC in collaboration with Internews’ Earth Journalism Network.

The future of Earth's environment will be decided in Asia, home to 60 percent of the world's population and some of the world's fastest-growing economies. Journalists play a key role in informing audiences about the future and current state of the environment and what can be done to protect it. Yet, in a time when environmental issues have never been more pressing, media coverage remains constrained.  Thousands of journalists are working to correct the imbalance, making great efforts to cover the environment in the face of obstacles from governments, corporations, criminal elements, and even their own editors.

The panel includes environmental journalism leaders Imelda Abano (Philippines), IGG Maha Adi (Indonesia); Joydeep Gupta (India); and Lican Liu (China); they will discuss their work as reporters and the actions they have taken to support environmental journalism in their countries and region.

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