Conflict and Media

Journalists reporting from regions of conflict face unique challenges in providing accurate and impartial news. “One careless word or one inaccurate detail can ignite a conflict,” said Fiona Lloyd, one of two media trainers who designed a special training program for Internews aimed at journalists who work for media outlets within strife-torn areas. “But equally, one clear, balanced report can help to defuse tension and neutralize fear.”

Related Stories

  • BBTT arrives in Bentiu! Information Aids Residents of South Sudan’s Largest POC Site

    A woman journalist sits with a group of residents, some adults, some children.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016

    “Meme e Boda Boda Ruai Ruai, lat in niam ka Bentiu P.O.C.!” – blasted from the motorbike’s speakers, as it was driven around South Sudan’s largest Protection of Civilian (POC) site. “This is Boda Boda Talk Talk! Program One for Bentiu POC!”

    News of the long-awaited launch of Boda Boda Talk Talk (BBTT) in Bentiu rang out in the Nuer language, spoken by the majority of Bentiu’s 120,000 POC residents. The hyper-local humanitarian information service launched in October, bringing two-way news and information to the community.

  • Journalist Sprint – Young Sri Lankan Reporters from Different Ethnic Backgrounds Collaborate on Covering Stories

    A group of journalists stand outside a house interviewing a woman who stands in the doorway
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016

    For over 30 years, Sri Lanka suffered through a violent ethnic-based conflict that killed an estimated 90,000 people. Since peace was declared in 2009, the government has attempted to rehabilitate and integrate those who fought with the defeated Tamil separatists. However, continuing suspicions and discrimination present obstacles for Tamils seeking to make a future in their country.