Governance and Transparency

Media serve a crucial watchdog function, providing citizens with the information they need to keep the public and private sectors accountable. In many countries, however, repressive legal environments inhibit the media's ability to play this role. Moreover, some journalists lack the skills to conduct the in-depth investigative reporting that is essential to accountability.

Beyond traditional forms of media, people's access to information via the Internet, cell phones and other communications technologies can be stifled by a restrictive or monopolistic regulatory environment. Internews has trained journalists in investigative reporting, produced television programming to encourage dialogue on corruption, and helped reform media laws, including expanding freedom of information rights.

Related Stories

  • A Deaf Journalist in Nigeria Fights to Advance Disability Rights

    Friday, September 16, 2016

    Deaf activist and journalist, Julius Shemang was frustrated with the lack of coverage of disability issues in mainstream media, In 2006, he started his own newspaper — Kafanchan Times —that covered disability as well as other human life issues. Although he had to put the paper on hiatus due to financial reasons, Julius still advocates for the rights of people with disabilities in Nigeria and to get the mainstream media to cover their issues, particularly regarding the passage of a disability rights law.

  • Farmers Find Happy Listening in the Golden Land

    Image for Farmers Find Happy Listening in the Golden Land
    Thursday, September 8, 2016

    A young farmer – in flip flops, short sleeves, with his face uncovered – is spraying his crops with insecticide. Suddenly, in the next field over, he sees another farmer covered from head-to-toe in protective gear, and realizes that he is exposing himself to dangerous chemicals. Inspired, he dons close-toed shoes, long sleeves, gloves, and a facemask: lesson learned. 

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