Governance and Transparency

Media serve a crucial watchdog function, providing citizens with the information they need to keep the public and private sectors accountable. In many countries, however, repressive legal environments inhibit the media's ability to play this role. Moreover, some journalists lack the skills to conduct the in-depth investigative reporting that is essential to accountability.

Beyond traditional forms of media, people's access to information via the Internet, cell phones and other communications technologies can be stifled by a restrictive or monopolistic regulatory environment. Internews has trained journalists in investigative reporting, produced television programming to encourage dialogue on corruption, and helped reform media laws, including expanding freedom of information rights.

Related Stories

  • Afghanistan Government Pledges to Protect Journalists and Freedom of Speech

    Abdullah Abdullah stands behind a group of microphones.
    Wednesday, May 6, 2015

    “We will support you and stand by you,” H.E. Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, Chief Executive of Afghanistan, told journalists gathered at a media conference in Kabul on April 26, the first of its kind in Afghanistan.

    The two-day conference, titled “Media and Transition Decade,” was organized by the Afghanistan Journalists Federation (AJF), an association of nine media support organizations that represents a cross-section of Afghanistan’s media sector and aims to serve as a bridge between media outlets and the government.

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