Governance and Transparency

Media serve a crucial watchdog function, providing citizens with the information they need to keep the public and private sectors accountable. In many countries, however, repressive legal environments inhibit the media's ability to play this role. Moreover, some journalists lack the skills to conduct the in-depth investigative reporting that is essential to accountability.

Beyond traditional forms of media, people's access to information via the Internet, cell phones and other communications technologies can be stifled by a restrictive or monopolistic regulatory environment. Internews has trained journalists in investigative reporting, produced television programming to encourage dialogue on corruption, and helped reform media laws, including expanding freedom of information rights.

Related Stories

  • Forums in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras Address Freedom of Information and Threats and Challenges for Journalists

    Thursday, June 23, 2016

    In an effort to enhance freedom of expression and access to information in the three Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, Internews organized forums in each country to provide key representatives from media, civil society and state institutions a unique opportunity to share their concerns and hopes on the issues. 120 participants attended the three forums.

  • Showing Corruption from the Skies

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016
    In Moldova, journalists used drones to capture images of a secret luxury retreat for powerful Moldovan government leaders and posted them online. The footage caused a stir in a country where government officials regularly live lavishly off public coffers while one fifth of the nation’s 3.6 million people scrape by in poverty.
     
    “We were able to send a message to politicians that they should be more transparent with the money they spend, because this money belongs to all of us.”
     

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