Governance and Transparency

Media serve a crucial watchdog function, providing citizens with the information they need to keep the public and private sectors accountable. In many countries, however, repressive legal environments inhibit the media's ability to play this role. Moreover, some journalists lack the skills to conduct the in-depth investigative reporting that is essential to accountability.

Beyond traditional forms of media, people's access to information via the Internet, cell phones and other communications technologies can be stifled by a restrictive or monopolistic regulatory environment. Internews has trained journalists in investigative reporting, produced television programming to encourage dialogue on corruption, and helped reform media laws, including expanding freedom of information rights.

Related Stories

  • In Covering Parliamentary Elections, Afghan Reporters are the Bridge between People and the Government

    Tuesday, February 24, 2015

    In April of last year, and then again in June, Afghans stunned the world as they came out to the polls in drove, defying Taliban threats to vote in the country's first-ever democratic transfer of power. The high national turnout in both the April and June run-off votes can be attributed in part to the informed and unbiased elections coverage found in local and national elections reporting, something noticeably absent during the previous election in 2009, when international news served as the only reliable source of information.

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