Humanitarian Communications

Image for Humanitarian Communications
(credit: Meridith Kohut/Internews)

In humanitarian disasters people affected by the unfolding tragedy need more than physical necessities: they also have an urgent need for information. From earthquakes to armed conflicts, survival can depend on knowing the answers to questions such as: is it safe to go back home? Should I stay with my family or go elsewhere for help? What is the extent of the damage? Where can I get clean water and food? What are the symptoms of cholera? Where is the nearest health facility?

Since the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia, Internews has been building partnerships and working closely with humanitarian organizations and government agencies at all stages during emergency responses.

Internews is a pre-qualified partner of the UK Government’s Rapid Response Facility (RRF), and operates at the heart of the humanitarian system in partnership with key agencies such as the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Internews also hosts the CDAC (Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities) Secretariat in London.

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    The Internews Center for Innovation & Learning is pleased to announce the launch of a major report with The Rockefeller Foundation, "Why Information Matters: A Foundation for Resilience." This groundbreaking report draws on case studies to construct a framework and practical guidelines for using information ecosystems to promote resilience.

  • A New Radio Station in South Sudan Inspires the Local Community

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    Nile FM, a new community radio station, has just been established in Malakal, South Sudan as part of Internews’ Humanitarian Information Service, to respond to the information needs of Internally Displaced People (IDPs) in the region, living in informal settlements, or taking shelter within the local UN military base.

    “People listening can hear information from doctors, or about food and water distribution - Nile FM can pass that directly and quickly to the community,” says Steven Anter, Nile FM Community Correspondent. “It’s a good way to get information out – and also to check if the information is true.”

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