Fellows' Coverage Hits the Front Pages at Home

“This is my first front-page story on climate in a year,” said Margot Roosevelt, one of this year’s Earth Journalism Fellows –10 journalists from the United States who joined 31 CCMP Fellows from the developing world in Cancun. Roosevelt produced two front-page stories for the LA Times from Cancun, along with a story on the front page of the business section.

For the Fellows, the opportunity to report from the climate talks provided much more than first-person coverage of negotiations. “I have a year’s worth of material,” said Roosevelt, noting that her attendance at the summit – which would not have been possible without support from EJN – provided her an opportunity to develop invaluable contacts in climate science and policy.

Reporter Eyram Acolatse said she returned to Ghana “bubbling with ideas” of how to cover Ghana’s first commercial production of oil from new angles.

Coverage from EJN and CCMP Fellows at the conference include:

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